How to Win Over a Dumbed-Down America

A recent article on one of my favorite websites, Factcheck.org  describes a post-election poll that is sure to incite headaches in some (and infuriate others). It points out that, after the 2008 Presidential election was completed, a large portion of the country had completely bought into the “spin” (read: lies) told by both sides of the campaign; many Republicans still believe that Obama is Muslim, and many Democrats still believe that McCain was going to hack apart Medicare (neither of which was true).

What is most disturbing to me in the article is this statistic:

Political ads run thousands of times and reach far more people than articles on FactCheck.org. On our best day, we were read by 462,678 visitors. By contrast, the Obama campaign aired two ads claiming that McCain planned to cut Medicare benefits a total of 17,614 times at a cost estimated to be more than $7 million – which is several times more than FactCheck.org’s entire annual budget.

Considering that a large portion of the public believed the claims espoused in those ads, it would seem that two things convinced many Americans of its truth: repetition and money. By investing serious cash into commercials that aired repeatedly, the Obama campaign was able to convince many voters that McCain would be cutting Medicare (obviously the same goes for McCain’s ads on Obama).

I see two possible ramifications of this as it relates to education. First, maybe repetition is still an effective strategy for convincing people of something. Sometimes, repetition can be effective. Second, it seems like throwing money at an idea can be effective, as well. Is it just me, or are those some pretty cynical conclusions to draw from all of this?

Advertisements

One response to “How to Win Over a Dumbed-Down America

  • Tammy Gillmore

    No, here’s cynical for you…I kept thinking that the funding for one ad would enable teachers to have an abundance of supplies, resources, technology…

    So much can be spent on campaigns…but funding for education either gets put on hold or cut.

    Maybe I am just too cynical?!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: